Events2018-03-29T14:41:36+00:00

Events

“Better Science, Better Health” hosts a series of international conferences to outline research and innovation in adaptive clinical pathways and patient data usage.

Forthcoming Event

Webinar: Addressing Geopolitical Challenges to the Price of Medicines

26 October, 4pm UK

Innovative health technologies are often enthusiastically viewed as game changers however their costs are sharply criticised. Take, for example, CAR T-Cell therapy, which has a price of up to 500,000 euro per person. This raises many questions. For example, what is a fair price for a medicine? How should the price be related to the effectiveness or the number of end-users? What about the risks taken by the company to get the therapy to market? What about the risks taken by the end-user who use the medicine? And what about the risks taken by the payer? Is it unrealistic to think that there is a solution that would be fair to all stakeholders? And how can we ensure that the whole system is financially sustainable in the long term?

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Recent Events

Webinar: Improving patient safety: why perioperative care and effective monitoring matters

28 September, 2021, 2-3pm CET

In Europe, 2.4 million patients undergo high-risk surgery every year and while surgery is safer today than ever – it is not totally risk free, Evidence suggest that death during surgery is now rare but the 30 days after the procedure are crucial – more than 1 in 100 adults (1.5%) die in the first 30 days following their operation. During high-risk surgery it is vital that blood continues to flow to organs. If blood pressure drops, and organs do not get enough blood, the higher the risk of severe postoperative complications, such as myocardial injury, acute kidney injury, and increased mortality, These drops in blood pressure are known as intraoperative hypotension (IOH) and are common – particularly in more senior patients. As little as a minute of IOH can increase the risk of patient harm or death and there is low awareness of this urgent issue among patients, clinicians, and policy makers. However, if IOH is effectively monitored and managed, many of these issues can be reduced or avoided. In addition, the need to improve perioperative care has been accentuated by the pandemic, which has put pressure on hospital capacity.

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Webinar: Equity and Outcomes, Ensuring Fair Access to Healthcare

28 September 2021, 4pm UK

Life expectancy is generally on the increase, including healthy life expectancy. New treatments that have greatly improved the chance of survival following the diagnosis of life-threatening diseases.

However, comparisons of survival rates reveal striking differences among countries for cancers, cardiovascular disorders and other serious non-communicable and communicable diseases, even between countries with a similar GDP. What are the reasons for these differences and, more importantly, what are the best ways to address them? The aim of the session is to raise awareness among health policy makers, clinical and biotechnology, health professionals, academics and interested public and patients about gaps and needs for equity in health outcomes and fair access to healthcare.

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Webinar: Artificial Intelligence – Improving Health, from Smart Hospitals to Smart Homes

24 August 2021, 4pm UK

What do developments of smart hospitals and smart homes mean for patients, health professionals and policy makers? Better diagnostics? Better medicines? Greater efficiency? Nowadays use of the term artificial intelligence (AI) elicits all sorts of reactions, from enthusiasm to fear. How much are these reactions well-founded? One thing is clear: when it comes to health, AI can be applied in myriad ways, from all of the departments in a hospital to all corners of one’s home.

Given the patchy performance of public health approaches during the COVID-19 pandemic, with the benefit of hindsight, how can we better harness available data to improve decision making for improved societal health, cost management, and patient outcomes – better safety of medicines, control of long-term conditions and solutions for rare/orphan diseases?

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Webinar: Vaccines, Trusted Information and Fake News

27 July, 4pm UK

Within many countries the COVID—19 pandemic is entering a 3rd wave and vaccine confidence is a live issue. According to an August 2018 edition of the Economist, “Italy, France and Serbia … have lower child-vaccinations rates than Burundi, Rwanda and Senegal.” On a background of differences in regulatory approaches to COVID-19 vaccine approvals and statements critical of COVID-19 vaccine efficacy by national leaders, Belgium at one point in 2021 had received 200,000 units but had only been able to distribute 4% of their quantity due to a lack of acceptance in the general public. In contrast, the WHO notes preparedness to accept a COVID-19 vaccine of 65% in recent surveys in Less Developed Countries.
How do we ensure that valid information regarding vaccines is circulated and accepted at all levels of society both in developed and in less developed countries? How do we disentangle outright vaccine refusal from vaccine hesitancy?

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H.R. 3’s international reference pricing misses the mark

By Susan Peschin and Duane Schulthess, April 28, 2021

The White House and Congress have declared that reining in Medicare prescription drug costs to help older adults and people with disabilities is a top priority. But one drug pricing strategy on the table would have an outsized negative impact on people with Alzheimer’s disease and decimate research trying to find effective treatments for it. This strategy, known as international reference pricing, ties the price that Medicare pays for some drugs to those paid by other countries. The idea was first introduced as a model for Medicare Part B drugs by then-HHS Secretary Alex Azar in 2018. The next year, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s drug pricing plan, known as the Elijah E. Cummings Lower Drug Costs Now Act (H.R. 3), significantly expanded the scope to allow federal government use of foreign price controls in direct negotiations with pharmaceutical companies for the cost of 250 prescription medicines in Medicare Part B and Part D. It also extended the negotiated price to insurers and the commercial market at large.

Webinar: Taking the next step: health literacy and the fight against cancer

14 April, 8.30-9.00 CET

Higher degrees of health literacy support patients at every stage of their journeys: they help to navigate decision-making and elevate patients to partners. If combined with health literate institutions, the coproduction of health can improve patient care and help reduce costs of unnecessary and inappropriate medical intervention.
Policy changes to increase health literacy have been notoriously difficult to implement, due also to a lack of evidence about the correlation between measures to increase health literacy and actual outcomes. Several initiatives have taken on the task to create such evidence. Most recently, Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan promises to make cancer literacy a priority for European policy makers, guidelines, and programs of action.
What do we know about the value of health literacy, where do we need to know more? How can we achieve higher degrees of health literacy? What lessons can we draw from the current pandemic? Join two outstanding experts for an Early Bird discussion on health literacy!

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Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan: Why we need it now

10 Feb, 2021, 08:30 – 09:00 CET

"Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan” sounds like something that should be around already. With the Europeans carrying 25% of the global population’s cancer burden, a coherent strategy tackling cancer incidence and mortality in Europe is only consequential. Or is it? Cancer treatment remains a personal and often local matter, and different perspectives exist across Europe on access to cancer care, budgets, and spending. These are reflected in different public health systems and policies at the level of EU member states. Cancer control activities vary greatly within Europe as do the outcomes of cancer care. Considering high European ambitions, persisting interests in member states, and local sensitivities: What can we expect from Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan? How can it become a success and more than just yet another document?

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Archive

Webinar: Cancer care during a pandemic – what have we learned so far?

10 March, 18:00-18:30

It will probably take years before we can understand the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on cancer patients. We know about decreasing diagnosis, interrupted treatment cycles, and other unintended effects of pandemic control measures. We don’t know, however, what exactly these changes mean for cancer patients and their survival rates. Even though high-quality data is often lacking and there is significant heterogeneity in real world evidence connecting treatment delays with increased mortality, studies increasingly highlight delays in cancer treatment during the past months. More recently, there have also been attempts to standardize estimates of the effects of treatment delays on survival rates, offering important lessons for cancer care systems. How can we quantify the impact of delays in cancer treatment on mortality? What do we know about the causal links between pandemic control measures and cancer care? How can patients, health care professionals, and policymakers help minimize delays in cancer treatment initiation?

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Cancer prevention: what’s worth the effort?

24 November, 2020, 8.30 CET

As roughly 40% of all cancers are considered preventable, prevention is high on the political agenda. Vaccination programs, environmental policies and supporting healthy lifestyles feature prominently all over the world, including within Europe’s Beating Cancer Plan. When prevention works, it is a cost-effective element of any long-term cancer control strategy. Little is known, however, about the actual effects and causal links between preventive policies on cancer incidence, and mortality. Evidence linking prevention to verified results is scarce, and often unclear regarding which policies and programs work, and to what degree. How strong is the case for cancer prevention? How should prevention be incorporated into national cancer plans? And ultimately, what is the role of prevention in evidenced-based health policy decision-making?

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Centralizing Cancer Care? – Quality, costs, and the future of hospitals in Europe

14 October, 2020, 8.30 CET

Centralizing cancer care has been a hot topic for quite some time. Many argue that hospitals are often too small and treat too few patients. Only by pooling resources and specialists in comprehensive cancer centers could high-quality care and equal access to innovative therapies be guaranteed. Yet, the Covid pandemic has shown that reducing the number of hospital beds may also be problematic for the quality of care. Broad availability of hospitals can help intercept epidemic outbreaks and maintain medical expertise – also in oncology. How should the future of inpatient cancer care look like in Europe? Is centralization still the way forward, or do we need to maintain broad operational readiness and expertise?.

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Webinar: COVID-19 VACCINES ARE COMING – A Magic Bullet or a Load of Blanks?

Wednesday, 30 September, 20.00 – 21.00 CET (2.00 pm – 3.00 pm, US Eastern)

Given the huge societal and economic impacts of the coronavirus in Europe, everyone is hopeful that COVID-19 vaccines will soon be available – but what happens next? According to an Economist report from August 2018, in the past decade vaccination rates in some European countries have often fallen below those in parts of Africa. It claims that Italy, France and Serbia have lower child-vaccination rates than Burundi, Rwanda and Senegal. After billions of Euros have been invested by governments, what will happen if many EU citizens are unwilling to take the vaccine? What can be done now to ensure that those who need the COVID-19 vaccine most are treated first when the vaccines are available? Furthermore, how do EU member states plan on measuring and monitoring the safety of vaccines that have been rapidly put onto the market ̶ and who will ultimately be accountable? And from the patient’s perspective, how can we build trust around the EU’s management of COVID-19, which has become increasingly politicised?

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EHDEN Online Roadshow

A series of 3 webinars focussed on ‘The Role of Health Data in the Post Covid-19 Era’

Goal of the webinar series:
The webinars will present an opportunity to explore utilisation of Real World Data/Real World Evidence in Spain and Spanish-speaking countries, as well as to compare and analyse wider European and Spanish RWD/RWE initiatives in the spirit of creating collaborations and strengthening relationships.

Videos & Report

Who pays for hope? – treating cancer early

9 September, 2020, 8.30 CET

Cancer is still often considered a death sentence. It is the second leading cause of death globally and will soon overtake cardiovascular disease as the number one killer. As a result, the main effect that people expect treatments to have is to prolong overall survival either through curing the disease or by slowing its progression and reducing cancer-related symptoms. Indeed, great progress has been made in recent years and cancer mortality grows at a much slower pace than cancer incidence.

This webinar intends to discuss different perspectives on how funding decisions should be approached depending on the setting of the disease.

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Webinar: Lung Cancer in Europe: New Ideas for Policy Action

15 July, 15.00-16.00 CET

This year more than half a million Europeans will be diagnosed with lung cancer. While many countries have improved the management of lung cancer through better prevention, detection, diagnosis and treatment, the disease continues to claim 1 in 5 cancer deaths across Europe, posing significant challenges to patients and healthcare systems. To identify further opportunities for improvement, The Economist Intelligence Unit made a comparative analysis of lung cancer policies across 27 countries. Over the course of 18 months almost 200 experts provided their insights and advice. During this webinar we will discuss the main findings of this new, landmark study, and discuss in particular the role that governments and policy makers can play in addressing the high burden that lung cancer presents.

Video & Slides

Webinar: What can Europe learn from Germany’s ‘National Decade Against Cancer’?

17th June 2020, 11.00-12.00 CET

While Europe is working on creating a Cancer Plan, many Member States have national cancer plans and other ambitious initiatives. For example, Germany that is one year into its Decade Against Cancer. German institutions for research and healthcare, the private sector, political institutions and civil society are joining forces for cancer research, cancer prevention and improved therapy of cancer patients. Germany aims to cure or control cancer long-term in 75% of patients by 2030.
What can Europe learn from Germany, and what are the key success factors for a government driven multi-stakeholder action to improve cancer care?

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Webinar: Now or later? When is it time to pay for lung cancer screening?

10th June, 2020, 08:30 – 09:00 CET

Lung cancer is responsible for 1 in 5 cancer deaths in Europe. Last year, around half a million Europeans were diagnosed with lung cancer and 400,000 people died of the disease. The survival rates are quite low, but thanks to improvements in diagnosis, surgery, radiotherapy and medicines, they are getting better. The question is, should we screen more aggressively for lung cancer now, or not?.

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Webinar: France – A New Method, New Framework, and New Roadmap for Improved Patient Access

20th December 2019, 9am CET

In France, it takes 530 days between market authorisation and patients having access to a new medicine. It’s 374 days in Spain, 111 in the UK, and 106 in Germany. In this webinar we discuss the current access challenges to access to new, innovative oncology treatments in Europe, as well as reforming processes to make reimbursement pathways clearer and more efficient. The objective is to foster timely and appropriate access for those patients with unmet medical needs, and increased clarity and certainty around regulatory access decisions.

Video & Slides

Strategic Medicare Contracting Forum – Duane Schulthess discusses the Impact of the IPI on Patients, Outcomes and Innovation

Duane Schulthess discusses the Impact of the IPI on Patients, Outcomes and Innovation
21 November 2019 2.15pm ET


Vital Transformation has conducted two studies examining the impact of the proposed international reference pricing in Medicare Part D on the world-class innovative biotechnology sector in California and the United States.

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